How much do you LV scarves?

I wonder if anyone’s ever asked you the question: what’s the most money you’d pay for a scarf? Would it be £10, £20 or even £50? I’m going to hedge a guess that it wasn’t £490, unless you’re the proud owner of the Stephen Sprouse Rose scarf from Louis Vuitton, the most indulgent scarf out there. Though this scarf is admittedly very eye catching in fuchsia pink with a rose pattern outlined in black, that doesn’t detract from the fact that it could still be mistaken for a pair of old curtains really, and it would probably be cheaper to actually get out a needle and thread and sew together £20 notes to drape around your neck. In ultra-fine cashmere, it’s not a scarf that’s going to keep you particularly warm, it’s just a bit of neck candy. But when LV do a scarf, even a ridiculously pricey one, they’re one of a kind and it’s rare to find any left on the shelves – this specimen sold out in London the day it went on sale last week. And if you’re waiting till they’re on the reduced rack next season you’re just being silly! It’s pretty, pink and will no doubt look stunning wrapped around your neck, but is £490 too much to pay for a scarf, or is that me being stingy? When you think that £490 would probably cover the monthly food bill for a struggling family in a downward spiralling economic climate, I’m surprised that the emergence of this scarf hasn’t caused a bit more of a reaction, especially when you could definitely take the scissors to a pair of old curtains and achieve practically the same effect. So I’d be tempted to save the pennies, attack household fabrics instead (with permission of course).

This is a scarf you'd have to look after

This is a scarf you'd have to look after

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